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Eligibility: Applicants must be seeking college or university degrees and be enrolled as juniors, seniors or graduate students during the summer and/or fall term in 2017. Scholarships are awarded without regard to the student’s major or field of academic concentration. Previous scholarship winners are not eligible. Students in countries other than the United States may apply as well. 

Requirements: The specifics for all six scholarships are below. Applications must be emailed by the end of Nov. 15, 2017. All entry materials must be in English.

The Bill Walsh scholarship will go to an applicant who aspires to edit news and who demonstrates the talent and passion for language that Bill devoted his life to.

Applicants for the other five scholarships should have a commitment to a career in the editing of written materials and demonstrate effectiveness in doing so.

By submitting a separate application for each, an entrant can seek both the Walsh and one of the other scholarships, but can win only one.


The six steps to apply for the Walsh scholarship

1. Provide your résumé, with evidence of academic achievement and exemplary work in editing. Please include information on other substantial achievements/activities/interests.

2. Provide references (with contact information): a total of three instructors and/or work supervisors.

3. For successful editing, Bill Walsh wrote in one of his books, “a finely tuned ear is at least as important as formal grammar.” Write an original essay of 500 or fewer words about how you fine-tune your ear as an editor.

4. By rewriting it, edit the following first paragraph of a news article to make it clearer and more reader-engaging without it being any less accurate.

On a day fraught with pomp and circumstance, the Senate failed to act Tuesday on a bipartisan measure to codify the gradations in penalties for growing medical marijuana. Instead, they fastened upon one of the only controversial provisions of the House-passed bill and lengthened the maximum sentence to ten years and/or a $500,000 fine.

5. Write a headline using no more than eight words for each of these three pieces of news:

A.

Millennials have been priced out of buying their first houses in many desirable areas, but a study by the real estate data gatherer Zillow points to more affordable houses in the Midwest and Southeast. The top five cities in the study: Orlando, Tampa, Indianapolis, Las Vegas and San Antonio.

B.

NEW YORK – In a death-defying feat worthy of a championship bout, famed professional wrestler Randall (Randy the Dandy) Raguso leaped onto a subway track Wednesday, scant moments before a train arrived, and rescued a young woman who had fallen from the station platform.

The woman, who was not identified, then immediately shook herself from Raguso’s grasp and ran out through an exit.

C.

KABUL – A firefight Friday among anti-government forces in a village about 50 miles west of Afghanistan’s capital killed 19 people, government sources said, including five children, and wounded two U.S. pacification team members, one critically.

6. Using one or more Word attachments, email your complete application to alex@aceseditors.org.


The five steps to apply for an ACES EDUCATION FUND scholarship

1. Provide your résumé, with evidence of academic achievement and exemplary work in editing. Please include information on other substantial achievements/activities/interests.

2. Provide references (with contact information): a total of three instructors and/or work supervisors.

3. Write an original essay of 500 words or fewer on the topic “What led you into editing and how do you envision your career path as an editor?”

4. Write a one-line summary or headline for each of these three pieces:

A.

Yoga is a mental discipline. We have many systems in our body, both voluntary and involuntary. Our muscular system is primarily voluntary. We train ourselves to stand up and to walk by watching our parents and others. We learn through repetition, and create patterns in our brain. After we have mastered such a skill, we can effortlessly go to that pattern and repeat the skill. We are basically self-programming. It is a lot like walking a maze. At first, you are lost, running into walls! After you learn the pattern of the maze, you can quickly go to the center.

B.

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has called for an expansion of school choice programs. She said the Obama administration spent billions on low-performing schools without improving students’ test scores.

DeVos said the focus should be on individual children, and that charter schools and school vouchers can make that happen.

“Our nation’s commitment is to provide a quality education to every child to serve the greater public, common good,” DeVos said. “Accordingly, we must shift the paradigm to think about education funding as investments made in individual children, not in institutions or buildings.”

C.

Sanford Biggers knows how to grab the attention of viewers. He knows how to get them to think, how to get them talking about the power and meaning of art and history. And how to get them discussing issues that they might prefer to avoid — especially race in America.

For his exhibition "Subjective Cosmology," the 45-year-old American conceptual artist has created a 30-foot-long version of what has become a signature work for him. It's an inflatable vinyl sculpture of Fat Albert, the title character of Bill Cosby's moralistic 1970s Saturday morning television cartoon. Biggers positions him lying face down. An electric air pump causes his body to slowly heave up and down as if breathing.

The artist is riffing on the many recent unarmed black male victims of police violence, and he's also referencing the sexual assault allegations against Cosby and creating a multilayered parable about fallen idols, race in America and the challenges facing African Americans, particularly young men, in urban areas.

5. Using one or more Word attachments, email your complete application to alex@aceseditors.org.


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