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Building a Stable Workload as an Editorial Freelancer

Building a Stable Workload as an Editorial Freelancer

June 25, 2020 By Tanya Mykhaylychenko

As an editorial freelancer, you are constantly mastering and evaluating new marketing channels until you reach a point where your workload stabilizes and clients find you for the most part, instead of the other way around. Getting to this point may take several years. This article discusses online directories, referrals, websites, and LinkedIn.

A Directory Listing

If you are a member of an editorial association, you likely have an online directory listing. You may also want to use some version of this listing across three to five other general business directories that are most often visited by your target clients.

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Referrals

A satisfied client is highly likely to send you a referral. Jake Poinier, aka Dr. Freelance, recommends asking past clients if they may introduce you to anyone in their network who may benefit from your services (avoid the word “referral”). An introductory email where all parties are copied is a good way to start the dialogue. Remember, the quality of your work and communication is the key factor in getting repeat business and referrals.

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A Part-Time Contract

It is always helpful to have a more long-term, stable source of income; a contract with a company ensures that you have work while looking for new (ideal) clients.

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Your Website

A professional website that follows the latest usability trends is a sure way to establish your credibility, answer your clients’ questions, drive your search engine performance, and offer useful advice. If you currently don’t have a website, write down a list of your services and target audiences. Based on this list, create a website map to follow.

  1. Start with a logo, banner, a brief description of your services and your rates.
  2. Have a professional headshot and record an introductory video.
  3. List the definitions of your services and pricing.
  4. Design and upload a downloadable flyer advertising your services.
  5. Use white space and plain language principles to increase usability.
  6. Collect client testimonials for the website.
  7. Analyze the terms your clients use when searching for your services and create a list of 20-50 keywords.
  8. Remember to update web pages once in a while so Google sees your website as fresh.
  9. Periodically run website backup.
  10. Set up Google Analytics to track your site visits.
  11. Add a blog (optional).

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Your LinkedIn Profile

A LinkedIn profile is a free tool to be findable, land new clients (through LinkedIn ProFinder if you are U..-based), and build a network of professionals for future opportunities. Once your detailed, SEO-optimized profile is up, use it actively to ensure visits to your profile, share useful information and introduce yourself to more people.

  1. Regularly send personalized, meaningful connection requests to potential clients and colleagues.
  2. Share quality content: your blog posts, third-party content, and text-only posts (repurpose your blog posts or use new ideas to answer your clients’ questions).
  3. Send personalized messages with links if content is directly relevant to a particular person.
  4. Try LinkedIn Ads to promote posts offering free 15-minute consultations, worksheets, e-books, or anything else of value that you want to be seen by more people.
  5. Write LinkedIn articles. They get more intentional views than regular posts.
  6. Comment on others’ posts and share insights (add something of value to their post).
  7. LinkedIn groups do not seem to be very active. Prioritize individual contact and articles.
  8. Send private messages to anyone who comments on or re-shares your post, if applicable.

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As your marketing evolves, you may add a newsletter, podcast and webinar appearances, video tutorials, e-books, printable checklists and cheat-sheets, and additional social media channels.

Header image by Asya Tes on Unsplash.

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