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ACES announces award winners and more at 2019 annual conference

ACES announces award winners and more at 2019 annual conference

April 4, 2019 By ACES Staff

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND – Award winners, scholarship recipients, and AP Style updates were just some of the announcements made at the 23rd annual conference of ACES: The Society for Editing (ACES) in Providence, Rhode Island, March 28-30.

The Associated Press’ announcement of its updates for the 2019 stylebook resulted in audible gasps from the audience present at the conference. Updates included the change from spelling out “percent” to allowing the use of the “%” sign and the removal of the hyphen from dual heritage terms such as “Asian American” and “African American.” Another significant update is a new umbrella entry called race-related coverage. “The new section is intended to pull together similar, scattered entries, update guidance, and attach more importance to the topic,” said Paula Froke, lead editor at the AP Stylebook.

At the 2019 ACES Education Fund Spelling Bee on March 27, 12 spellers tackled recent dictionary entries, words of Scottish origin, and commonly misspelled words. The winner was eventually crowned when Beth Chapple defeated Kate Karp in the final round. All funds for the Spelling Bee went to the ACES Education Fund, to provide scholarships for students. Lingofy sponsored the event. The Spelling Bee brought in more than $1,200, said ACES Secretary Neil Holdway. Learn more in our announcement.

The 2019 winner of the Bill Walsh Scholarship is Nancy Coleman, a University of Missouri senior who has interned with two international news organizations. Coleman won $3,000 plus financial support to attend the 2019 ACES conference. Learn more about Coleman and the Bill Walsh Scholarship in our announcement.

The winner of ACES’ 2019 Aubespin Scholarship ($2,500) is Anya van Wagtendonk of the Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at the City University of New York (CUNY). The other four winning students each received $1,500 scholarships: Emily DiAlbert, of Ohio University; Lee Davidson, a graduate student at the University of Central Florida; Savanna Smith, of the University of Kansas; and Sabera Akhter, a graduate student at The George Washington University. Read more about each of the 2019 winners in our announcement.

The winner of the 2019 Glamann Award is Joe Skeel. The Glamann Award was designed to recognize those who have made a significant contribution to editing and/or ACES. Skeel is executive director of the Indiana State Bar Association, and before that served as executive director of the Society of Professional Journalists. Teresa Schmedding, former ACES president, said that Joe “has had a massive impact on the industry. Without him, ACES wouldn’t be the organization we are today.” Learn more about Joe and the Glamann Award in our announcement.

The winner of the 2019 Robinson Prize is Rob Reinalda, executive editor at Ragan Communications. Reinalda received $2,000 and a crystal trophy. The Robinson Prize honors an “editor of the year” whose work exemplifies the values that ACES promotes. “Reinalda has set standards for excellence that people want to follow: He writes for Grammar Girl podcasts, one of his grammar and punctuation guides has been downloaded more than 1,000 times, his articles are picked up by Huffington Post, and he’s an endorser on the back of the 2018 Associated Press Stylebook,” said Christine Steele in ACES’ announcement.

ACES also announced the winners of the 2018 Headline Contest. The winning headlines were displayed in a slideshow during the Friday night banquet at the conference. ACES’ premier contest aims to reward exceptional headline writing in all types of media, from newspapers to social networks. Individual winners in professional categories won between $75 and $300, and individual winners in student categories won between $50 and $125. The winners each submitted multiple headlines.

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ACES is an international members’ alliance of editors working in digital media, traditional print media, corporate communications, book publishing, academia, government, and beyond. We work at your local paper, favorite website, and Fortune 500 companies. We are freelance editors, students, and professors. We’re united by a love of language and a passion for precision. Join today. Donate to scholarships.

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