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March 4th and celebrate National Grammar Day

March 1, 2015 By Gerri Berendzen ACES News

It’s just about time to march forth and celebrate National Grammar Day, which fittingly is this Wednesday (March 4th).

And we’ve got several ways for you to do that.

• Get out your special verse pens and craft something for the ACES National Grammar Day Tweeted Haiku Contest.

Just write your haiku and tweet it with the hashtag #GrammarDay. The deadline for entry is noon EST Tuesday and the winner will be announced at noon on National Grammar Day.

• Join in the #ACESchat from 4 to 5 p.m. EST on National Grammar Day. The guest will be Kory Stamper, a lexicographer at Merriam-Webster and one of the speakers at ACES national conference March 26-28 in Pittsburgh. Her ACES 2015 presentations will include English and How it Got This Way: A Brief History, where she promises to answer such questions as how did “impact” slip from noun to verb? To join the chat, just search for the hashtag #ACESchat.

• ACES Executive Committee member Sue Burzynski Bullard will be the instructor for the Poynter NewsU National Grammar Day 2015 webinar at 2 p.m. EST Wednesday. To celebrate Grammar Day, NewsU is offering this webinar for just $9.95. The one-hour presentation will give you what you need to know to steer clear of grammar and punctuation pitfalls. And there will be time for questions.

And if you can’t make any of these celebrations, check out the National Grammar Day website for other ways to mark the day.

You could plan your own celebration, just like the students in the University of Missouri ACES chapter have. Members of the chapter will host a celebration from noon to 2 p.m. Wednesday in the rotunda of Lee Hills Hall, where they serve snacks and have a grammar quiz challenge. If you’re having a National Grammar Day celebration, tweet a photo of your event to @copyeditors and we’ll share it.

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